COVID-19 – we cannot ignore it VIII – Netflix

Today another representative of an industry that might profit from the pandemic: Netflix. With people staying at home for more hours than before the lock-down, we see jigsaw-puzzles, knitting equipment and tools and materials for home-improvement becoming more popular. We expect people also to watch more movies and series and then Netflix would profit from the situation.

Photo by Andrea Piacquadio from Pexels

Again the Annual  and Quaterly reports were all in USD, hence no calculations. We agreed to take revenue, cash-flow from operations, equity and total liabilities and those could be obtained very easy. As promised the input-file is available (the output-file is the 3D-graph itself, of course – a .htm-file) and everybody who wants to try the 3D generator can download the full package for free – even without providing an email-address. It’s completely anonymous! If you like it I would appreciate if you drop me a line of course.

At a first glance, the conclusion might be that Netflix is really impacted in a positive way by the situation around COVID-19. Two red roofs in 2019 and suddenly a firm green one in 2020.
Double-clicking the screenshot will open the 3D-graph in your browser. Beware: thegraph haw so many companies that zooming out is necessary to see the whole picture! Clicking the right mouse-button and moving the mouse up and down at the same time, will zoom the graph in and out. For maniputalion of this 3D-graph: Clicking left while moving the mouse will tilt the graph in different directions. Double clicking in the graph translates it and readjusts the centre at the same time. Just try it – If you don’t know how to get the normal position back, refresh the page in your browser.
If we would have taken the net income, then all roofs would have been green and the more recent, the thicker. The funny thing is that the revenue for 2020 H1 was only slightly higher than for 2019 H2, so what’s going on? (Be aware that a red roof means the height of the building represents the total costs/cash outflow and the yellow part is the revenue. If the roof is green, it’s a part of the revenue).

Well, we know that Netflix invests a lot in their content and that’s really expensive. By the way:  they have to buy the content to be able to put it on the balance-sheet, because for content developed themselves that would not be allowed. Think about the major difference with the software-companies we wrote about in the past in comparison with e.g. Volkswagen. Buying content means a net outflow of cash, but not necessarily a decrease in net income, because the value remains in the company. It’s an investment! And what has happened with the investments during the three half years we show?  The Cash-flow statement has an entry called “Additions to content assets” (Q2 2020 statement – In the annual report a note is available for this topic). For our three periods the values are:

2019 H1

2019 H2

2020 H1

6.3 mln.

7.6 mln.

5.8 mln.

Keeping 1.8 (7.6 – 5.8) million in you pocket helps, although it doesn’t fully explain the sudden increase in cash-flow from operations, because that’s a change of over 3 mln. but it certainly helps.For the people who are curious and want to create an alternative graph: try and replace the cash-flow from operations with the net income as shown below:

2019 H1

2019 H2

2020 H1

615

1252

1429

Was this really a post about the financial upside of Corona? It wasn’t that easy to tell because so many things are changing with Netflix and in the end the revenue went up but then Netflix is growing anyway!

Next time we will present the last industry profiting from the pandemic: information technology. Don’t forget to download your free copy of AnRep3D at our website. Short tutorials, explaining different parts of AnRep3D are available at our Youtube-channel The white-paper and inspirational graphs can be downloaded at the homepage of our website: https://anrep3d.com Follow @AnRep3D on Twitter, to be informed about new posts.

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COVID-19 – we cannot ignore it VII – Tesco

Let’s move to the industries that might profit from the pandemic. We cannot know for sure of course, but entertainment, information technology and grocery-stores are candidates for the positive impact part of this series. It’s easy to say that we are leaving the doom and gloom behind, but let’s not forget that both Munich Re and BP were still doing rather well and showed a green roof (positive cash-flow from operations) in 2020. BP was left out because it is too large, but Munich Re is left out because of its huge liabilities (quite normal for a financial institution) as this affected the overall 3D-graph too much (stretching it out from front to back). Bombardier with its negative equity is still shown as a set of hollow boxes and Qantas and Wyndham will also stay, showing their red roofs for 2020.

Photo by Simone Hutsch on Unsplash

How is Tesco doing? It’s a British company, so the amounts in GBP had to be converted to USD. This was done with the help of xe. It turned out that Tesco has a very special broken book-year. This must be some British tradition as the year 2020 starts at the first of March, but the mid-year ends after 26 weeks creating dates like 29th of August 2019 and 24th of August 2020. We will ignore this and present the semi-annual amounts as if they were in the same periods as the others.

And now for the big question: did they do well? Looking at the graph we can see rather tall buildings (high revenue compared to equity (width) and total liabilities (depth) and the roofs are green. The revenue for H1 2020 is lower than for H2 2019, but very similar to H1 2019. Supermarkets usually have a higher turnover at the end of the year so this will bias the graph. The upside is that we don’t see a collapse in H1 2020 when compared to H1 2019 and the thickness of the related roofs is similar. Actually it’s slightly thicker in 2020, but there is also some financial juggling going on so we cannot be sure without a thorough investigation. I leave that to you as I don’t have time for it. Of course you can create you own 3D-graph using (and probably improving) the input-file for this post in combination with our free 3D-graph generator (even no email-address required, just a download).3D-graph showing Tesco semi-annual results

However, looking in more detail from the top, the equity went slightly down and the liabilities went up a little bit – even in comparison with H1 2019.

Top-view of 3D-graph Tesco results

In the end it looks like Tesco has been resilient, without really profiting from the pandemic. In the end the half year report H1 2020 tells what has been going on:

Cash profitability

  • Response to COVID-19 leading to £(533)m 1H UK costs as we prioritise customer and colleague safety
  • Retail operating profit before exceptional items and amortisation of acquired intangibles4 of £1,192m, +4.4%, margin 4.2%; – UK & ROI volume and business rates relief offset COVID-19 costs; CE held back by COVID-19 costs and new Hungarian tax – UK & ROI £1,133m, +6.4%, margin 4.3%

– Central Europe £59m, (23.4)%, margin 3.0%

  • Bank operating loss before exceptional items £(155)m driven by provision for potential bad debts and reduced income; continue to expect operating loss of £(175)m-£(200)m this year; capital ratios and liquidity remain strong
  • Retail EBITDA8 £1,994m, +4.1% higher YoY

Retail and bank-part respond differently, but in the end the Retail profited, despite the additional costs for safety measures.

That was it for the first post about the financial upside of Corona. Next time we will have a look at information technology and then (home) entertainment. Don’t forget to download your free copy of AnRep3D at our website Short tutorials, explaining different parts of AnRep3D are available at our Youtube-channel The white-paper and inspirational graphs can be downloaded at the homepage of our website. Follow @AnRep3D on Twitter, to be informed about new posts.

Photo by Matheus Henrin from Pexels

 

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COVID-19 – we cannot ignore it VI – Bombardier

Before starting I have to admit that I hardly knew Bombardier. A Canadian company manufacturing trains, to be taken over by Alstom. Somehow I got the impression that it was a powerful giant, but after analysing the annual and quarterly reports I changed my view.  Not only trains, but also aeroplanes and then half of the revenue is coming from European subsidiaries, but powerful? Well, the products might be good – I don’t know – but their finances are not healthy at all.

Photo by Andi Graf on Pixabay

The reports are very transparent and easy to obtain, but is this company a money incinerator? It shows negative equity to start with. Then the cost of sales is very close to the revenue, leaving hardly any money for other expenses and indeed losses were reported for the more recent periods.

In this series we are not looking at net income, but at cash-flow from operations and this was even worse. Looking at the calculation I was confused for a moment by the large negative amounts, but then I realised that some parts of the profit might not come from “operations”, hence their removal. It turned out that parts of the company were sold. Jumping from note to note I landed at note 31 of the annual report 2019 where it is explained that the trainings services were sold for more than USD 500 mln.  (precise amounts are mentioned in the note). Then in H1 2020 the trick was repeated by selling an aircraft programme to Mitsubishi for a similar amount. This means that the cash-flow from operations is a much better indicator of what’s going on.

The 3D-graph was not easy to obtain. The generator is able to deal with negative equity and the “building” will be shown as a hollow one. The issue was Munich Re being too large like BP was previously. I had to remove it from the input-file, but then the parameters had to be adjusted because a negative width (the equity) messes with the distances, but in the end the result was ok. The negative cash-flow is reflected in the red roofs for H1 2019 and H1 2020. Only H2 2019 had a small positive cash-flow from operations and therefore the roof is a thin green one.

Double-clicking the screenshot will open the 3D-graph in your browser. Beware: thegraph haw so many companies that zooming out is necessary to see the whole picture! Clicking the right mouse-button and moving the mouse up and down at the same time, will zoom the graph in and out. For manipulation of this 3D-graph: Clicking left while moving the mouse will tilt the graph in different directions. Double clicking in the graph translates it and readjusts the centre at the same time. Just try it – If you don’t know how to get the normal position back, refresh the page in your browser.

Rotating the graph will show the depth of the buildings (liabilities) better. Remember that with a positive equity the ratio would not have been healthy for a manufacturer (for a bank or insurance company it’s a normal shape) and here we are dealing with negative equity!

The question is still: ”what about Corona?”. Looking for the code “COVID-19” several occurences were found in the Q2 report 2020. The most relevant on probably being the one quoted below:

Operations Status and Financial performance Revenues of $2.7 billion during the quarter reflect a lower level of production activity and deliveries as operations at key Aviation and Transportation sites across North America and Europe were temporarily suspended due to the global COVID-19 pandemic. Revenues from services proved more resilient during this period.”

That’s a way to put it: hundreds of millions of revenue being missed as a result of the pandemic. On the other hand, have a look at the finance expenses: the liabilities are extremely high and a lot of money has to be paid – most likely not only interest but also high fees (hundreds of millions and even over a billion in 2019).

On page 58 of the Q2-report a whole chapter is explaining the impact of COVID-19, but it seems that the liabilities are even more dangerous to the company than the virus. Yet the desease might be cured, as Alstom acquired Bombardier in 2020 and the annual report 2020 will be its last.

Don’t forget to download your free copy of AnRep3D at our website. Short tutorials, explaining different parts of AnRep3D are available at our Youtube-channel

Follow @AnRep3D on Twitter, to be informed about new posts.

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COVID-19 – we cannot ignore it V – Munich Re

In our series about Corona we should have a financial institution and Munich Re is the candidate we selected. Munich Re is a re-insurance company, based in Germany. A re-insurance company is an insurance company for insurance companies – covering for extreme claims or unexpectedly high volumes of claims.

Photo by Lavir_Hamil on Pixabay

Our big question is still whether Munich Re felt the impact of Corona. Let’s have a look at the 3D-graph visualising our selection (Revenue, Cash-flow from operating activities, Equity, total Liabilities: RCEL). There is no real “revenue”, but the inflow of premiums can be considered as an equivalent. The way to survive is park the premiums in investments during the good years (low total claims amount) to have buffers for the bad years (the ones with high claims). The premium-income as revenue, free cash-flow, equities and liabilities are found in the annual (2019)  and quarterly/half year reports (2019 H1 and 2020H1). Not all reports were found easily, but then also spreadsheets with the financial details can be downloaded from the site. Munich Re publishes its figures in EUR and therefore I had to convert to USD again, but this time conversion rates used by the company were offered in the documents themselves. No need to look for the rates!

Double-clicking the screenshot will open the 3D-graph in your browser. Beware: thegraph haw so many companies that zooming out is necessary to see the whole picture! Clicking the right mouse-button and moving the mouse up and down at the same time, will zoom the graph in and out. For maniputalion of this 3D-graph: Clicking left while moving the mouse will tilt the graph in different directions. Double clicking in the graph translates it and readjusts the centre at the same time. Just try it – If you don’t know how to get the normal position back, refresh the page in your browser.

Preparing the input-file, I realised that I made the same mistake as last time with BP: Munich Re is huge, especially compared to Qantas and Wyndham. This giant looks more like an oil-major than like the largest hotel-chain in the word or a large airline! Again we will have a graph where the new company is pushing the others close to invisibility (although zooming is always possible of course).

Then there is something else which surprised me: the three “buildings” look very similar! Only the green roof (Cash-flow from operating activities) was much higher in 2019 H1 and that’s odd! Althoug Corona started in China at the end of 2019, it could hardly be responsible for the high impact (decrease in Cash-flow) in 2019 H2. Looking for Corona in the annual report for 2019, this sentence was found (p. 175):  

“Munich Re does not expect the consequences of the coronavirus to have any overall material effect on the annual result. However, the more this virus spreads, the greater the impact could be on Munich Re.”

It’s clear that is wasn’t Corona, causing the drop in Cash-flow, but what else could have caused it? In the same annual report it says [edited]:

“Aggregate losses from natural catastrophes totalled EUR 2053 mln. for the full year. […] The biggest lossevents of the year were Typhoons Hagibis and Faxaiin Japan, for which we expect total expenditure of around EUR 1300 mln…”

Even with an annual Cash-flow of over 10 bln. It’s a lot of money and it will certainly lower both cash-flow and profit. For 2020 H1 the situation isn’t any better. Despite the expection that Corona most likely would have a limited impact, the worst case scenario became true [edited]:

“Overall, we incurred COVID-19-related losses totalling around EUR 1.5 bln in reinsurance in the first half of the year.”

In the end we can conclude that the natural disasters in 2019H2 camouflaged the losses due to Corona in 2020H2.

After completing the series, we will create separate graphs combining BP, Munich Re and probably other companies and then the smaller ones like Wyndham and Qantas on another 3D-graph. Don’t forget to download your free copy of AnRep3D at our website https://anrep3d.com Short tutorials, explaining different parts of AnRep3D are available at our Youtube-channel

Follow @AnRep3D on Twitter, to be informed about new posts.

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COVID-19 – we cannot ignore it IV – British Petroleum (BP)

Of course I realised that an oil-major would be a terrible match when combined with the previous two companies, Qantas and Wyndham. Yet I took BP, because I expected it to be hit as hard as the other two. The huge BP-buildings in the 3D-graph make the others almost invisible, but to be honest I expected the pattern to be the same: lower revenue, negative cash flow, equity going down and liabilities going up.

Photo by Jack B on Unsplash

I was wrong! Although the revenue dropped and the equity went down, the cash flow did not become negative and the liabilities even went down instead of up (see input-file)! Yet a major loss was announced, so what happened?

An important difference between profit (loss) and cash flow from operations are all kinds of depreciation, amortisation and write-offs. The Q2 report says (p 22, note 3):

“Impairment charges for the second quarter mainly relate to producing assets and principally arose as a result of changes to the group’s oil and gas price assumptions.”

This is a huge part of the loss and it’s hardly related to Corona (consumption of fossil fuels went down because of Corona, but it’s not the major cause of the low oil price).

The note 4 at the same page says: “Exploration expense in the second quarter and half year was $9,674 million and $9,876 million and includes exploration expenditure write-offs of $9,618 million”

As a matter of fact it seems like significant parts of both the loss and drop in equity for 2020 H1 are caused by a changing strategy! This would mean that BP is not a good example of a company suffering from the pandemic, although it’s not helping them either.

Then we still have the liabilities. Looking at the group balance sheet (still same Q2 report, now page 17), we see the impact is mainly coming from the current liabilities, where “Trade and other payables” dropped. This would mean that debts were paid sooner – probably to help their suppliers to survive. This might be in indirect Corona-effect after all, but be aware, it’s just me speculating!

As a result of all those changes, the BP-building in the graph is lower and narrower for 2020 H2, but the depth is even less and the roof is green (positive cash flow)!

Double-clicking the screenshot will open the 3D-graph in your browser. Clicking the right mouse-button and moving the mouse up and down at the same time, will zoom the graph in and out. For maniputalion of this 3D-graph: Clicking left while moving the mouse will tilt the graph in different directions. Double clicking in the graph translates it and readjusts the centre at the same time. Just try it – If you don’t know how to get the normal position back, refresh the page in your browser.

The next time we won’t show BP in the graph. Not because it’s a bad example, but because it would dwarf out all other buildings in the graph, like it does now.

Don’t forget to download your free copy of AnRep3D at our website. Short tutorials, explaining different parts of AnRep3D are available at our Youtube-channel Follow @AnRep3D on Twitter, to be informed about new posts.

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COVID-19 – we cannot ignore it III – Wyndham

Another industry hit hard by the Corona pandemic is hospitality of course. A large hotel-company might provide a good example. Although I like to travel now and then, staying in different cities, I’m not much of a business traveller. I could call myself “CEO” of this small AnRep3D Company, but the truth is that I earn my bread and butter as a management consultant, currently working for a large bank with its headquarters close to where I live. When I stay in a hotel it’s usually rather modest like the one in the picture, often family-owned. To fit in the 3D-graph with Qantas already in it, we need more like a large chain with hotels all over the world, so I started looking.

Small Hotel

Photo by Free-Photos on Pixabay

Being a hotel-illiterate as explained above, I went to a ranking-site and picked their number one: Wyndham. It was a good choice, because a lot of information is shared at the Wyndham-site. All necessary quarterly and annual reports were available, so it was easy to put the numbers in my input-file (shared again as promised).

After generating the 3D-graph, the result was a bit of a surprise. Looking at the numbers I could have known, but I prefer the 3D-graph to get a good impression. The largest hotel chain in the world turns out to be much smaller (looking at the revenue) than an airline which is not even in the top ten of the world. Qantas’ revenue is less than the revenue of number ten in airlines.Qantas and Wyndham 3D-graph

Double-clicking the screenshot will open the 3D-graph in your browser. Beware: thegraph haw so many companies that zooming out is necessary to see the whole picture! Clicking the right mouse-button and moving the mouse up and down at the same time, will zoom the graph in and out. For maniputalion of this 3D-graph: Clicking left while moving the mouse will tilt the graph in different directions. Double clicking in the graph translates it and readjusts the centre at the same time. Just try it – If you don’t know how to get the normal position back, refresh the page in your browser.

Yet the revenue of the world’s largest hotel-chain is still six times smaller (height of the building in the graph). Be aware that the numbers are semi-annual and the annual value for e.g. 2019 is the sum of H1 and H2. Qantas ranks high when it comes to customer satisfaction and safety, so it is well-known after all. Wyndham on the other hand is probably not as well-known as Marriott or Hilton.

It’s not only about the revenue of course as a 3D-graph shows more. The equity is more or less the same magnitude (width of the buidlings), but the liabilities (depth of the buidling) are much lower for Wyndham – less than one-third! Yet the liabilities for Wyndham and Qantas grew rapidly during H1 of 2020 whilst their equities shrunk and we shouldn’t be surprised about that.

Finally there is something special with the Wyndham cash-flow (the coloured roof of the building). Like with Qantas we expected a healthy green roof for 2019 H1 and H2, but H1 is red. For 2020 H1 it is cleary the result of the Corona-virus hitting the industry, but why 2019H1? The quarterly report shows that because of the acquisition of La Quinta, completed in 2018, provisions had to be made for upcoming tax liabilities. It is a huge amount: USD 188. Without such a provision the roof would have been green after all.

For now, don’t forget to download your free copy of AnRep3D at our website. Short tutorials, explaining different parts of AnRep3D are available at our Youtube-channel Follow @AnRep3D on Twitter, to be informed about new posts.

Photo by AllClear55 on Pixabay

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COVID-19 – we cannot ignore it II – Qantas

Let’s start with an industry which was impacted by Corona in a negative way: aviation. A typical example would be Qantas. Thinking about the right period and granularity to provide a good comparison between the normal period and the pandemic period, I noticed that Qantas publishes semi-annual reports. Three half-year periods would be good. H1 2019 was quite normal, H2 2019 held the start of the Corona-outbreak in Asia but was quite normal, but H1 2020 was a global disaster and Qantas was hit really hard.Aeroplane Qantas

Photo by skeeze on Pixabay

Because the AnRep3D-generator is freeware now, I will explain the process of the collection of data in more detail this time. Hopefully this will help you if you are a reader who wants to experiment with it.

To fetch the financial information I went to the Qantas Investor Centre and selected the semi-annual and annual reports. The balance-sheets are presenting the fixed situation at the end of the period, but the revenue and cash-flow from operating activities had to be calculated for the second half of the year by subtracting the values of the first half. Normally not a big deal, but Qantas has a broken book-year going from July 1 to June 30. As a result the first half of the year in the calendar is their second half and it took some effort to avoid confusion!

Finally I had the results, but then I realised the $ symbol in an Australian document might represent the AUD instead of the USD. In the report no currencies were explained, only some references to the conversion of USD to AUD. To be sure I went to Wikipedia, where the 2019 amounts for e.g. revenue and equity were presented with A$ in front. Then I knew I had to recalculate to USD. Using the Macrotrends site  I got the appoximate values for the middle of the periods (for Revenue and Cash Flow) and for the end of the periods (Equity and Liabiliies), allowing me to get reasonable USD values.

Qantas preparation sheet

The spreadsheet (see picture above) looked rather complicated. To the top left the (derived) half-year values in AUD were presented, with more to the right the necessary exchange-rates. To the bottom the values were transposed and calculated in USD. After adding a parameter-line to the top of the list (holding the number of companies: 1, number of periods: 3, scaling-factor: 250, additional spacing: 20, font-size:4 followed by the three labels for the legend).

This structure matched the input-file format and the whole sheet was saved as a .csv-file because I was too lazy to copy it to another tab. I just removed the irrelevant lines over the parameter-line in Notepad. As promised this time both input-file (csv – plain text) and output-file (the actual graph in HTML5 – right-click link and choose save link as) are available for download.Qantas finance in 3D

Commenting the 3D-graph is hardly necessary. The revenue dropped sharply in H1 2020 and the liabilities went up. Yet I was surprised to see the high ratio of total liabilities to equity (gearing).

I’m not an expert on finance in aviation, but the buildings look more like a bank or insurance company than a regular service-provider or manufacturer. The fact that the aeroplanes are not owned by the company, but only leased will influence the shape of the building.

For now, don’t forget to download your free copy of AnRep3D at our website. Short tutorials, explaining different parts of AnRep3D are available at our Youtube-channel Follow @AnRep3D on Twitter, to be informed about new posts.

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COVID-19 – we cannot ignore it.

The holiday-season is comming to an end and people will be online again more frequently now. Time for a new blog-post, but no 3D-graph in this one yet! With the previous series (data is the new oil) being complete, a new one will come in. Of course the (partial) lockdown is going on in several countries although this isn’t something new. The only thing is that it takes a while before the impact of this Corona-virus is visible in the quarterly reports. China was hit even before 2020, but in Europe and the USA the panedmic really started during Q1 of 2020. Now most of the reports for Q2 2020 will be available and this would be the right moment to visualise the data of a series of companies during the upcoming months.

Wearing a mask - Corona

Photo by Potsdamn (Henrik Bortels) on Pixabay

The SARS-CoV-2 virus – usually referred to as COVID-19 – is a nasty creature from a human perspective. Several Corona-viruses are travelling around the world without doing a lot of harm, but it seems like this one found a key to one of our locks and got carte-blanche. With our globalised economy it could travel rapidly and here we are with the economy being hit very hard. Yet some companies prosper in this new situation, so the series about the impact won’t show doom and gloom only. The question is how the mix should be presented. The jury is still out.

During the holidays, something really important happened to our product: the 3D-graph generator AnRep3D is freeware now, so download your free copy right away! We don’t even ask for registration, because in the end we don’t want to put any threshold in. Everybody should be able to experiment with AnRep3D without reluctance. The manual is in the package and some examples of input- and output-files (3D-graphs in HTML5-format with Javascript generated real-time in the cloud) are in.

We already provided the 3D-graphs (= output-files) with every post, but from now on, we will also add the input-files. This will help the users to experiment and understand how the generator works.

OK, we know that the upcoming posts will add companies with either a negative or a positive impact from the pandemic. Revenue and cash-flow from operating activities will be good a good combination and this time equity versus total liabilities might be another nice perspective. Very different from the traditional RPEA we used in the previous series (RPEA being short for Revenue Profit, Equity and total Assets).

Doom and Gloom

Photo by KELLEPICS (Stefan Keller) on Pixabay

To be honest, I don’t yet have a clue what the 3D-graph will look like, because a “disaster” can be something like 10% loss of revenue only, but I expect the cash-flow be hit harder. Will companies increase loans to survive? Let’s see where we will get. What I do know is that we will take examples from the industries below.

Down by Corona: Travel and Tourism, Hotels and related, Oil&Gas, Finance, Manufacturing

Up by Corona: Groceries, Online entertainment, Online vendors, Tech companies

Supermarket

Photo by ElasticComputeFarm on Pixabay

For each group we will take a representative from somewhere in the world (having standardised quarterly reports available).

For now, don’t forget to download your free copy of AnRep3D at our website.

Short tutorials, explaining different parts of AnRep3D are available at our Youtube-channel

Follow @AnRep3D on Twitter, to be informed about new posts.

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Great news – an AnRep3D-licence will be free from now on!

A short, but very important update. No 3D-graph this time (although new posts will come in soon), but only a message.

For a couple of years we have been offering the 3D-graph generator. It hasn’t been easy to inform as much people and companies as possible about our product and have them trying the product (and eventually buy a licence). Yet the number of people and companies being interested went up gradually and the stats show more and more visits to both the company-website and this blog.Freedom by Sasint

Photo by sasint on Pixabay.

Now the question was:  “will we invest in AnRep3D again and come up with a new version?” The conclusion was that we should reach a broader audience first. To be able to do so, we should make the threshold for experimenting and using our 3D-graph generator as low as possible. The best choice for now would be to make the fully functional AnRep3D-generator a free package – without limitations (except the usual ones, stated in the terms and conditions).

Go right to our website, to the licence-tab and download a package today! Everything is in, including folders with examples of output-files (.htm-files in html5 format) and related input-files so you can create these 3D-graphs again yourself an even modify them. Modifying existing input-files would be a good way to become familiar with AnRep3D-generator. The manual – also in the package – will help you to understand all the details.

We will continue to post new examples of the application of the AnRep3D-generator, but from now on we will also offer the input-files we used. This is important to help you as a user understand the background of the graphs shown in a post. Follow us on Twitter (@AnRep3D) or have a look at our website where links to the white-paper, this blog and out youtube-channel can be found. Our mail-address is also available at the website.

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