Agriculture in 3D – minerals, livestock and farmland

To be honest, it was quite a struggle. In Europe we have very nice and publicly available statistics, so I thought it would be easy to show how AnRep3D is able to visualise agricultural data. Indeed it was quite easy to get the data for the Nitrogen (N) and Phosphate (P) surplus per hectare (is about 2.5 acres) of farmland. But then I noticed gaps, negative surplus-values (that’s possible of course – it means there is a lack of the mineral). And of course Europe is quite large, so I had to determine which countries to show and also which years to report. For clarity: nitrate and phosphate are useful compounds in agriculture, but a surplus will pollute land and water, causing damage to the environment. That’s why Europe collects those data.

Fertilising with manurePhoto by pascvii on Pixabay

It made sense to use the height of the AnRep3D “buildings” for nitrate (N – rather large values) with a green roof for phosphate (P – more modest values). To avoid confusion: N is the chemical symbol for Nitrogen and P for Phosphorus, but we use them to identify the derived compounds NO3 (-) and PO4 (3-).

We know the real issue with minerals on farmland is the number of animals in relation to the available amount of farmland. The manure has to go somewhere and putting it on the land is the traditional solution. With this in mind the width of the buildings could represent the number of animals and the depth the surface (square kilometers – km2 is about 247 acres) of farmland. So far so good, but then other issues arose. The agricultural land numbers includes wasteland and woods, but we all know the manure won’t get there. In the end it turned out the surface reported by the European statistics covers for permanent grassland, permanent crops and arable land. The others seem to be subcategories.

Farmland bird's view

Photo by Tom Fisk on Pexels

The years didn’t match quite well with those of the minerals, so in the end I took 2013, 2014 and 2015 applying interpolation for the minerals.

The next issue was about the animals. It’s nice to count them, but if one country has mainly cattle, the next one goats and sheep and another one mainly chickens? It’s not a fair comparison. Fortunately there is a standardised unit, correcting for the impact of the animal and this is the LiveStock Unit (LSU). Yet the numbers made no sense and didn’t match with my reference-values either. In the end I disovered the LSU-tables offer two units: numbers (just a headcount and not LSU at all) and real LSU. After this the input-file was ready in a couple of minutes.

Livestock

Photo by sasint on Pixabay

The only choice I had to make was about the size of the values. The N- and P-values were converted to gram of surplus per square kilometer (g/km2). The surface of farmland (arable, permanent crops and permanent grassland) was already converted from Hectare to km2. Only the LSU could either be in kLSU (kilo-LSU = thousands) or in hLSU (hecto-LSU = hundreds). The former offers a compact graph, the latter provides a better overview for smaller countries, but is very wide. I decided to generate two different 3D-graphs this time. The one with kLSU is compact enough to show all the countries in it in a glance (the other one is for part II in the next post). A couple of countries have very high values for the nitrate-surplus, with the Netherlands being the number one. Be aware that because of the parallax the names of the countries are not in front of their “buildings” in the screenshot.

3D-graph agriculture

Double-click the screenshot to see the live 3D-graph in your browser. For manipulation: Clicking the right mouse-button, moving the mouse up and down will zoom the graph in and out. Clicking left and moving the mouse will tilt the graph in different directions (or move the observer’s viewpoint around a fixed graph – it’s relative of course). Double clicking in the graph translates it and moves the centre at the same time. As a result the way the graph tilts will change. Just try it. If you don’t know how to get the normal position back, just refresh the graph.

For more detail a zoomed screenshot is shown below (also clickable).

Detailed 3D-graph agriculture

For now, this will do. In the next post we will discuss the LSU and surface of farmland – and show the other graph.

For more information about the generator of 3D-graphs, please have a look at our website (https://anrep3d.com) There a  free demo-package (zip) can be downloaded, unpacked in a folder and the .jar file can be used immediately. For a better understanding of the generator we have a couple of short movies at our youtube-channel. Our email-address is info@anrep3d.com  and you can follow is on Twitter: @AnRep3D

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AnRep3D in Telecommunications (TelCo)

AnRep3D could have different names for different markets and purpospes of course, like EnRep3D (meaning Energy Representation in 3D and this might be the best alternative as it sounds very similar). Or something like CuCaRep3D (Cure and Care Reporting in 3D) and maybe even TelCo3D. We would need a lot of different manuals. For now the full manual, provided with our free demo-package is still focusing at Annual Reports. Yet it is good to show some alternatives, despite the name of the generator. Today it’s TelCo’s turn.

Classic telephone pole

Photo by aitoff at Pixabay

 

 

 

Photo to the right by hpgruessen at Pixabay Modern telecom antenna

Let’s be honest: I don’t know much about Telecommunications (TelCo). I worked in this industry for about half a year, in a smaller company so I got a good overview of the complexity of the operations. Yet I’m not familiar with the strategy. To me Telco strategy is a strange mix of physics, economics and culture.

Usually I write about subjects I know, like finance (although a very broad area), energy and healthcare. Next time I hope to talk about the chemical part of agriculture, but first I would like to draw the attention of people in the world of TelCo. Don’t take this post too seriously, as I’ve just been collecting some numbers, to be able to show a 3D-graph.

From a consumer-perspective TelCo is about minutes, messages, megabytes and perhaps antennas, so those are the subjects I took.

Woman with phone

Photo by rawpixel at Pixabay

To get some data I took a Dutch marketing site, presenting minutes, texts and MB in thousands, which I converted by me to Mmin (millions of minutes of phone calls), Mtxt (millions of text messages) and GB (Gigabytes or billions of bytes). Then I went to the website of a Dutch regulator for the number of antennas active during a couple of years. It turns out there is a lot of them. Not millions, so I don’t present Mega-antennas but just their absolute number. The combination was available for four years, so it will be a rather simple graph this time.

 

First I show the input-file in Excel, just before saving it to a .csv-file (“MS-DOS format”, Excel still says after more than twenty years of Windows).

Inputfile AnRep3D in Excel

 

 

 

Then the output: the 3D graph in html (can be viewed in a webbrowser). The legend/key is put in the screenshot as a picture in picture, to provide some guidance.

Telco first 3D graph front-view

Double-click the screenshot to see the live 3D-graph in your browser. For manipulation: Clicking the right mouse-button, moving the mouse up and down will zoom the graph in and out. Clicking left and moving the mouse will tilt the graph in different directions (or move the observer’s viewpoint around a fixed graph – it’s relative of course). Double clicking in the graph translates it and moves the centre at the same time. As a result the way the graph tilts will change. Just try it. If you don’t know how to get the normal position back, just refresh the graph.

When I opened the graph is was surprised, as it is very different from the previous ones. Data-consumption has grown explosively, it seems. At the same time the number of text-messages went down, although not as impressive as one would expect. Most people replaced them by app-messages which will be in the data-segment. However, at the same time the Internet of Things (IoT) applications came up and sometimes a simple mobile phone sim-card is used to let those devices send their messages. This will put a halt to the decline of the text messages, I guess. The real IoT growth is in the data-segment of course.

Telco first 3D graph top-view

The number of antennas has increased slightly. So how do they keep up with the growth in data-usage? Were these antennas oversized from the beginning?

Although I thought this would be the end of this post, I was really curious about the background of this modest growth, so I dived a little deeper.

 

 

 

Photo (right) by republica at Pixabay

 

In the report of the regulator there is a classification in GSM (900 or 1800), UMTS and LTE. The latter is for real IoT-data. Counting the anntennas per category, an even more interesting graph could be created. A screenshot is shown below.

3D-graph antennas NL

Double-click the screenshot to see the live 3D-graph in your browser. For instructions on manipulation, see 3D-graph above

The LTE are coming from nowhere in 2013 to more or less the same number as all GSM-antennas (and nearly the same as UMTS) in 2016. All the growth in the number of antennas is coming from the LTE-group, but is there a relationship between data usage and LTE-antennas? Or was a lot of capacity available in the first place and has the percentage of occupation of the bandwidth gone up? I really wouldn’t know, but maybe some expert can elaborate us?

For more information, please have a look at our other posts at this blogsite, our website (https://anrep3d.com) or our youtube-channel. The free demo-package (zip) can be downloaded, unpacked in a folder and the .jar file can be started immediately. Our email-address is info@anrep3d.com  and on Twitter we are @AnRep3D

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Non-financial use of AnRep3D: a healthcare example

In the final post on Amazon, Alphabet and Apple I already talked about the alternative use of AnRep3D. Although designed as a tool for the visualisation of data from Annual Reports (hence the name AnRep3D), the use it not limited to this purpose.

Woman pointing at graph

(Photo by geralt on Pixabay)

As a matter of fact, AnRep3D is a very generic and versatile instrument that is able to visualise a wide range of data sets on different subjects, in a 3D-graph.

 

 

Basically single graph-elements (“buildings”) are places in a chess- or checkerboard-like (whichever you like best) structure, also referred to as “Manhattan”. There is no need whatsoever to put years from front to back and neither do the labels in front need to refer to companies. In the end it’s all about a matrix, holding graph-elements.

Woman playing street-chess

(Photo by kevin laminto at Unsplash)

Getting to these elements, they only visualise three values in the input and set the height, width and depth of a “building”. The height is a bit special, as a part of it can be coloured green (behaving as a “roof”). A negative value is not a part of the height value, but added on top of it, providing a red “roof”.

This fourth option is nice and makes the graph more colourful and interesting, but there is no need to use it. The second value can simply be set to zero, creating a yellow building at one of the blocks between Manhattan’s Streets and Avenues.

For some it will be hard to look at AnRep3D this way, as about 50 posts have been dealing with the visualisation of financial data, taken from Annual Reports. On the other hand, this approach provides a lot of freedom to creative minds, thinking of alternative usage of the tool.

To be honest: we already hinted at those options when visualising energy in 3D, having years (yes, still years) and countries (not very different from companies) at the sides of the grid. The buildings themselves however, showed the energy-mixes for e.g. renewables (of which biofuels as a subsection), nuclear and fossil fuels as primary sources.

Electricity-transmission

(Photo by jplenio at Pixabay)

In this post I will give a very different example, taken from Healthcare in the Netherlands. This is because nearly everything in this country is measured and documented, so the result will be interesting.

To obtain two sets (still in time: annual values), I split the data between:

  • General Hospitals and
  • University Hospitals.

For both a set of characteristic values was obtained:

  • Total number of beds, of which beds in intensive care mentioned separately
  • Turnover (in millions of Euros. Hospitals do not have real “revenue” or “sale” values.)
  • Staff, measured in Full-Time Equivalents, rather than “bodies”.

Female doctor

(Photo by voltamax at Pixabay)

The data was obtained from a (Dutch) site on healthcare, with some small adjustments made.

Input-file for hospital 3D graph

The input-file will not be very different from the previous ones. It’s just numbers. Below a screenshot is shown. The additional semi-colons are irrelevant. The data were entered and ordered in Excel and saved as a .csv and doing so the additional semi-colons came in. Of course the first line is still the parameter-line!

The output is like always an html-file to be viewed in a webbrowser, where the 3D-graph will be shown and can be translated, rotated and zoomed in or out. Double-click the image (only a screenshot taken from one angle) to see the actual 3D-graph.3D-graph on hospitals

 

Double-click the screenshot to see the live 3D-graph in your browser. For manipulation: Clicking the right mouse-button, moving the mouse up and down will zoom the graph in and out. Clicking left and moving the mouse will tilt the graph in different directions (or move the observer’s viewpoint around a fixed graph – it’s relative of course). Double clicking in the graph translates it and moves the centre at the same time. As a result the way the graph tilts will change. Just try it. If you don’t know how to get the normal position back, just refresh the graph.

Interesting, but not surprising is that for General Hospitals and University Hospitals the ratio between turnover (width) and staff (depth) is not very different. The (large) university hospitals are together about half the size of the other hospitals for both the money and the people. Not a surprise, as the wages are the greater part of the total budget, despite the expensive devices.

On the other hand, the number of beds is much lower in University Hospitals. More like a quarter of the number of the General Hospitals. Apart from Outpatients and Daycare (the latter may or may not be reflected in the number of beds, but is certainly related to the staff) the patients in a University Hospital have usually more complicated health issues. Also interesting is that the changes over time are rather small. In a spreadsheet they look more impressive.

For more information, please have a look at our other posts, our website (https://anrep3d.com) or our youtube-channel. Again, the free demo-package (zip) can be downloaded, unpacked in a folder and the .jar file can be started immediately.

Our email-address is info@anrep3d.com and on Twitter we are @AnRep3D

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fAAnG revisited – alternative financial ratios visualised III

This will be the third and last post on this subject. As already announced, not all fAAnG companies will be in the graph – only the 3 A-companies: Amazon, Alphabet (although still represented by Google’s G in the acronym) and finally Apple.

Woman with iPad (Photo by cuncon on Pixabay)

Originally I expected the cash flow approach, together with current liabilities and current assets to be very interesting, but obviously it’s not. Only a fraction of the visitors of the previous series seems to be interested. Next time I will write about a very different subject, but of course still using the AnRep3D generator to create 3D-graphs. So let’s keep it short, because the subject is not as exciting as I thought.

Like before, I picked the numbers from both the form 10-K and the Annual Report. For numbers that were accumulative, I subtracted the previous totals. Although Apple has a broken bookyear, that’s irrelevant now because we are talking quarters. All companies are in USD, so that’s not an issue either.

The combination was a bit of a surprise, as Apple has a high cash flow, but relative to the total sales or revenue, Alphabet is in the lead. Then, Apple has more or less the same ratio of Current Assets to Current Liabilities, although the amounts are both twice as large.

Alphabet, on the other hand, has a much better ratio as the current assets are about the same as Apple’s, but its current liabilities are much lower! Neither Alphabet nor Apple show a negative cash flow during the period from the start of 2017. Yet Amazon did as the two red roofs show immediately.

Amazon Alphabet Apple 3D graph

Double-click the screenshot to see the live 3D-graph in your browser. For manipulation: Clicking the right mouse-button, moving the mouse up and down will zoom the graph in and out. Clicking left and moving the mouse will tilt the graph in different directions (or move the observer’s viewpoint around a fixed graph – it’s relative of course). Double clicking in the graph translates it and moves the centre at the same time. As a result the way the graph tilts will change. Just try it. If you don’t know how to get the normal position back, just refresh the graph.

For more information, please have a look at our other posts, our website (https://anrep3d.com) or our youtube-channel. Again, the free demo-package (zip) can be downloaded, unpacked in a folder and the .jar file can be started immediately. Our email-address is info@anrep3d.com On Twitter we are @AnRep3D and we have a page at LinkedIn.

That’s it for the 3A-companies! Let’s see what the next subject will be.

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FAANG revisited – alternative financial ratios visualised III

Two weeks ago I posted a rather heavy story, discussing a lot of financial theory. This time I will focus on the companies and the numbers again.

Before we go on, I have to share something. I really like MOOCs and I already attended a lot of courses at FutureLearn Some were about e.g. modern (online) marketing methods (as my education was about classical marketing), others were not related to AnRep3D at all.

Business Woman working

(Photo by Daniela_oliiver on Pixabay)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This time I took a course from edX about finding the right markets for ones technological innovations. I think AnRep3D is very innovative after all, but it was designed for the visualisation of financial information in the first place. Yet there are other opportunities out there, I think. This means that during the next period I will show examples of alternative subjects again, as I already did with energy. Of course energy will be an important target market as well and I will blog about it, but I am also thinking of new markets.

Autonomous light bulb

(Photo by ColiN00B on Pixabay)

A bit scary, because I know about Finance and Energy and the other subjects might be less familiar to me. Well, let’s see what comes up. I hope you will like it!

Back to the FAANG companies! We already saw Amazon in the 3D-graph and now we should combine it with Alphabet. Although the name of the holding changed from Google to Alphabet, the stock exchange still refers to it as GOOG, but I put in a label Alphabet.

Google SEO (Photo by Simon on Pixabay)

Of course I had to extract some numbers from the Forms 10-Q. The format is really nice and clear, but still companies have some room for their own structure. It turns out Alphabet only mentions cumulative “Net cash provided by operating activities”, so for Q2 – Q4 calculations were needed.  There is no Q4 of course as this will be covered by form 10-K, so the values for Q3 have to be subtracted for Revenue and Cash Flow. As the balance is a snapshot one has only to be careful to pick the right rows and columns – no calculations needed.

After generating the 3D-graph with the two companies in, I decided to reverse the order again. It seems so logical to enter the values chronologically, but the most recent values are the most interesting. By turning the 3D-graph around, we can see the reversed order, so no information gets lost. The picture below (clickable, as usual) is a composite. In the real 3D-graph the legend (key) is in front of the “buildings” and below ground-level, but to keep the picture more compact I inserted another screenshot.

Amazon Alphabet 3D

 

Double-click the screenshot to see the live 3D-graph in your browser. For manipulation: Clicking the right mouse-button, moving the mouse up and down will zoom the graph in and out. Clicking left and moving the mouse will tilt the graph in different directions (or move the observer’s viewpoint around a fixed graph – it’s relative of course). Double clicking in the graph translates it and moves the centre at the same time. As a result the way the graph tilts will change. Just try it. If you don’t know how to get the normal position back, just refresh the graph.

For more information, please have a look at our other posts, our website (https://anrep3d.com) or our youtube-channel. Again, the free demo-package (zip) can be downloaded, unpacked in a folder and the .jar file can be started immediately.

Our email-address is info@anrep3d.com  On Twitter we are @AnRep3D and we have a LinkedIn company-page.

That’s all for now. Next time I hope I will be able to add Apple and then we will probably move on, exploring other subjects. Yet Finance will be visited on a regular basis.

Mars rover (Photo by WikiImages on Pixabay)

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FAANG revisited – alternative financial ratios visualised II

Time for a 3D graph! In the previous post I explained how we will use a different set of values to generate this new 3D-graph. Instead of Profit, we will take Cash Flow provided by Operations (The Net Sales or Revenue still being the total height) and where we usually took Equity and Total Assets, now it will be Current Liabilities (width) and Current Assets (depth).

Metaphor for Cash Flow (Photo by Artem Bali on Pexels)

This combination allows us to compare the Cash Flow to both Revenue (sometimes called Net Sales or Total Sales) and Current Liabilities. Looking from another perspective – top or bottom, the shape of a “building” in the 3D-graph actually shows the current ratio (Current Assets / Current Liabilities).

Buildings in Aerial View (Photo by Free-Photos on Pixabay)

If the “ground plan” shows a broad rectangle, the Current Liabilities are much larger than the Current Assets and the Current Ratio will below 1.A deep rectangle means the opposite, indicating that the Current Ratio is above 1. If it is – more or less –  a square, both values are balanced, meaning the Current Ratio is about 1.

This week we will start with Amazon to populate the 3D-graph. Other FAANG companies will be added later. The website Chron has an article on ratios related to Cash Flows and Current Liabilities. Quoting from the article:

“Obtain the operating cash flow from the cash flow statement and divide by the total sales found at the top of the income statement. This number describes the efficiency of the company’s efforts of turning sales into cash. If the company has $200,000 in operating cash flow and $1,000,000 in sales, the calculation is ($200,000 divided by $1,000,000) equals 0.2 times.”

As we use the Total Sales for the total height of the building and the Cash Flow from Operations to create the green roof-part of it (beware, a negative cash flow will add a red roof on top of the Total Sales, leaving Total Sales as the yellow part), we have a visual indication of the ratio. Another part of the article is about the Operating Cash Flow Ratio. Quoting from the article again:

“Find the cash flow from operations on the cash flow statement. Divide that number by the current liabilities on the balance sheet to find the operating cash flow ratio. This number gives analysts an idea of how much cash the company can provide beyond its liability payments. If the company has $900,000 in cash flow from operations as well as $150,000 in current liabilities, the operating cash flow ratio is ($900,000 divided by $150,000) equals 6.0 times.”

In the 3D-graph, this ratio is visual, because the width of the building – and the width of the roof for that matter – represents Current Liabilities and the height of the roof shows the Cash Flow from Operations.

3D-graph Q Front View

Double-click the screenshot to see the live 3D-graph in your browser. For manipulation: Clicking the right mouse-button, moving the mouse up and down will zoom the graph in and out. Clicking left and moving the mouse will tilt the graph in different directions (or move the observer’s viewpoint around a fixed graph – it’s relative of course). Double clicking in the graph translates it and moves the centre at the same time. As a result the way the graph tilts will change. Just try it. If you don’t know how to get the normal position back, just refresh the graph.

Unfortunately Q1 2017, in front of the screenhot (double click and open the real 3D-graph to see all quarters more clearly) shows a negative cash flow. On the other hand both the width of the second buidling (Q2 2017) and the heigth of the green roof are visible and it is clear that the Cash Flow from Operations is about 1/10th of the Current Liabilities.

3D-graph Q Rear View In more recent Quarters, the the ratio is going up. Looking from the rear, we see Q3 2018 and here Cash Flow from Operations is about 1/6th of the Current Liabilities.

 

Finally, we can also see the Current Ratio in the 3D-graph as discussed above. Last quote from the article:

“Find the current assets and current liabilities on the balance sheet. They are line items on the balance sheet. Divide the current assets by the current liabilities to find the current ratio, which is a fast way to calculate a firm’s health. If the company has $600,000 in current assets and $200,000 in current liabilities, the current ratio ($600,000 divided by $200,000)”

This ratio is shown by the top-view or bottom view. From the top we will also see if the Cash Flow from Operations was positive (green) or negative (red), so let’s take the top-view.

3D-graph Q Top View

Again, double-click the screenshot to see the live 3D-graph in your browser. For manipulation: Clicking the right mouse-button, moving the mouse up and down will zoom the graph in and out. Clicking left and moving the mouse will tilt the graph in different directions (or move the observer’s viewpoint around a fixed graph – it’s relative of course). Double clicking in the graph translates it and moves the centre at the same time. As a result the way the graph tilts will change. Just try it. If you don’t know how to get the normal position back, just refresh the graph.

Be aware that the article is about small businesses. Amazon isn’t a small business of course (its amounts are roughly a hundred thousand times higher than in the example), meaning the calculation will be the same, but the interpretation could be different. As a matter of fact you can see the Current Liabilities are much larger than the Cash Flow from Operations. At the same time, the Current Liabilities are well-balanced against the Current Assets.

Amazon

(Photo by SilviaP_Design on Pixabay)  Wrong Amazon, I know, but a picture of a Kindle or an Alexa is so boring).

Then another comment: all the ratios mentioned can be derived in a spreadsheet. AnRep3D doesn’t replace these calculations, but offers the opportunity to spot the interesting ones from a landscape with dozens of firms over dozens of quarters. There is no need to calculate all the ratios beforehand. Looking at more than one hundred buildings first will give a good impression and help to focus your scarce time on the really important companies at a specific moment. Once you have spotted them, it’s time to deep-dive and look into your Excel, which will provide detailed numbers and 2D-graphs.

For more information, please have a look at our other posts, our website (https://anrep3d.com) or our youtube-channel. Again, the free demo-package (zip) can be downloaded, unpacked in a folder and the .jar file can be started immediately.

Our email-address is info@anrep3d.com On Twitter we are @AnRep3D and we are also at LinkedIn.

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FAANG revisited – alternative financial ratios visualised

AnRep3D is able to visualise financial data from companies in time. By now most readers will know, but until now we have been rather conservative in this blog. It’s time to show more of the power of the generator.

Power Station(Photo by stevepb on pixabay)

Often we used the familiar set of Revenue, Profit, Equity and Total Assets (sometimes switching to Gross Profit or EBITDA and in some occasions taking Total Liabilities). Annual Reports were used to get the numbers and this seemed to be a logical choice because of the name of the product. However, there is no reason to avoid quarterly updates. Then, Profit can be replaced by something like Cash Flow from Operations (roof) and by taking Current Liabilities instead of Equity (width) and Current Assets only (depth), we have a completely different set of ratios (like current ratio and cash flow ratio)!

FangOf course we are looking for companies with a healthy cashflow. Why don’t we revisit some of the FAANG companies?

 

(Photo by SarahRichterArt on Pixabay)

 

Amazon, Alphabet (still called GOOG at the stock exchange) and Apple seem to present an ideal set of candidates to follow for a couple of quarters! Let’s see if the results are interesting (I don’t know yet – first we have to visualise).

Google Chrome Logo(Photo by geralt on Pixabay)

 

 

Where do we start? Well, with the form Q10 and probably the period 2017 Q3 to 2018 Q3.iPad

Apple has a broken book-year and will publish the report on the third quarter of 2018 only at the end of January, so we will start with the other ones.

 

(Photo by FirmBee on Pixabay)

Amazon is earlier in the list than Alphabet (it’s G for GOOG is at the end of FAANG), so let’s start with Amazon.

Amazon Parrot

(Photo by alvaroas8a0 on Pixabay)  Sorry, wrong Amazon, but this picture is less boring.

Again, I had to collect data from the Q10 forms and I created a collage from the three important statements (Cash Flow, Income, Balance) for Q2 of 2018 as an example.

Q10 form numbers

The relevant numbers got a red square around them. The others are for checking purposes –  not used in the graph. I will try and generate a graph showing the three companies together for the next posts, adding them one by one.

For more information, please have a look at our other posts, our website (https://anrep3d.com) or our youtube-channel. Again, the free demo-package (zip) can be downloaded, unpacked in a folder and the .jar file can be started immediately. Our email-address is info@anrep3d.com On Twitter we are @AnRep3D and we do have a modest LinkedIn-page as well.

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