Automotive 7 – Tesla

Tesla-time! By now you will know how the values (Revenue, [net] Profit, Equity and [total] Assets) will be extracted from the annual reports. One detail probably: it was rather hard to see how the shareholder’s equity was calculated. Like with Ford there was a separate amount for non-controlling interest, but here there was even another one. In the end I decided to take the difference between total assets and total liabilities as equity, instead of checking all the odd values. It doesn’t make a real difference anyway.

Then we have another issue: the acquisition of Solar City at the end of 2016. The influence is not really large and the other automotive companies have e.g. their financial services included, so actually none of the numbers in the graph are purely related to the manufacturing of cars. In the end the values we took the numbers as presented from the annual reports for all the companies (with some checks performed).

In this break I would have liked to put in a colourful picture of a Tesla, but it seems colourful Teslas are hard to find. Yet the picture is nice after all.

Woman sitting in Tesla (Photo by Taneli Lahtinen at Unsplash)

After increasing the number of companies, it was clear that Tesla should be even to the left of Mitsubishi Motors. Previously I called the latter a “dwarf” but how to classify Tesla, especially in 2012? A microbe? A germ cell? Perhaps a germ cell as it grew rapidly afterwards and from 2015 onwards it was more like Mitsubishi Motors (financially, that is). I really had to manipulate the graph (zoom, rotate, translate) for some time to be able to see the 2012 “building” for Tesla. The size of the year-label is an indication of how small the building actually is! For readers who haven’t seen the full graph yet, the screenshots are clickable (double-click)

Tesla in 3D-graph 2012

As already said Tesla grew rapidly and moving to the rear of the graph we can see 2015, 2016 and 2017. Tesla 2015-2017 in 3D-graphInteresting is that the red roof – indicating a loss – is much smaller for 2016 than it was for 2015.

The revenue goes up from year to year as the taller buildings in more recent years clearly show. Normally, the total height of the building is the revenue, and the yellow part represents the total costs, leaving the net profit which is represented by the green roof.

If the costs are higher than the revenue, the height of the building represents the costs. The yellow part is the revenue and the red area is the amount of money to be added to the revenue to cover the costs. In other words: a loss. If no new shares are issued, the equity will suffer from the loss and the building will be narrower than previous ones. Because Tesla was able to attract money from the market, the equity didn’t suffer in 2016. In 2017 however, the equity went down again. Now the waiting is for a green roof!

Tesla car in open field near wood

(Photo by Free-Photos on Pixabay)

If we zoom in even more, we can see Tesla is more like Mitsubishi Motors in the more recent years.

 

 

Tesla in 3D-graph detail

 

On double-clicking, the 3D-graph will appear in your web-browser. There are several options to move graph: clicking the right mouse-button, moving the mouse up and down will zoom the graph in and out. Clicking left and moving the mouse at the same time will tilt the graph in different directions (or move the observer’s viewpoint around a fixed graph – it’s relative of course). Double clicking in the graph translates it and moves the centre at the same time. As a result the way the graph tilts will change. Just try it. If you don’t know how to get the normal position back, just refresh the graph.

For more information, please have a look at our other posts, our website (https://anrep3d.com ) or our youtube-channel. Again, the free demo-package (zip) can be downloaded, unpacked in a folder and the .jar file can be started immediately. Our email-address is info@anrep3d.com

(Photo by Michelles_Photography on Pixabay)Tesla car in front of Tesla office

 

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Automotive – Intermezzo

I know, I know, this should have been the post in which Tesla would have been added to the graph. Instead of Tesla I put in an intermezzo. I understand it’s a terrible disappointment for all Tesla-fans, waiting for a 3D-graph on the financial status of their favourite company (tongue in cheek). As a consolation I can tell them the Annual Reports have been processed and I am ready to add Tesla the next time (and the fact Tesla Motors being a “dwarf” – just like Mitsubishi Motors – will remain a secret for another week).

Tesla chargers (Photo by JamesQube on Pixabay)

 

Why an intermezzo then? Well, the news about Carlos Ghosn being arrested was all over the media and Ghosn is the CEO of Renault and Chairman of Nissan and Mitsubishi. Allegedly he was also the driving force behind the Nissan Leaf. Of course all kinds of conspiracy theories came up and at the same time there is a large grey area in which successful people operate, as remaining strictly within the boundaries of the law won’t bring success in most cases (for a person, that is – not for a company). This means an investigation will always bring up something.

(Photo by Capri23auto on Pixabay) Renault 4

 

However, this blog is about 3D visualisation of financial data (and energy, for that matter) and not about politics or ethics. It means we won’t discuss the person, but it’s a good reason to extend the automotive series with Renault and Nissan, to see how they went during the period 2012 -2017. Mitsubishi was already in our graph, by the way.

Nissan Figaro (Photo by Capri23auto on Pixabay)

The question is, why did I select the original series of GM, Ford, PSA, Volkswagen, Mitsubishi and Tesla? Well, I just wanted to have American, European and Asian companies in the graph and then Tesla too, as it is completely different. That’s from a financial point of view of course, as the Ford I drive was manufactured in Germany, the only thing about it being American is all the legal disclaimers popping up at different moments (and – in my previous Ford – dialling 911 instead of 112 automatically when it thought I would have a collision). Now, with the extension another European company will be added (Renault) and another one from Asia. At the same time these companies are well-known in Western Europe, whilst e.g. Geely, SsangYong and JiangLing (known for the Landwind) are very rare. Toyota, Kia and Hyundai are not, so maybe we should think about those manufacturers as well or add them later after another intermezzo.

(Photo by John Volante on Unsplash) Honda

 

 

 

That’s it for now. The graph below remains unchanged, but next time it will be updated again.

Five automotive companies in 3D-graph

On double-clicking, the 3D-graph will appear in your web-browser. There are several options to move graph: clicking the right mouse-button, moving the mouse up and down will zoom the graph in and out. Clicking left and moving the mouse at the same time will tilt the graph in different directions (or move the observer’s viewpoint around a fixed graph – it’s relative of course). Double clicking in the graph translates it and moves the centre at the same time. As a result the way the graph tilts will change. Just try it. If you don’t know how to get the normal position back, just refresh the graph.

For more information, please have a look at our other posts, our website (https://anrep3d.com) or our youtube-channel. Again, the free demo-package (zip) can be downloaded, unpacked in a folder and the .jar file can be started immediately. Our email-address is info@anrep3d.com

Toyota SUV

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Automotive 6 – Volkswagen Group

Time for a shorter post! Volkswagen (also know as Volkswagen AG) publishes annoying annual reports! The pdfs opened at a very small, unreadable size every time. Then on trying to copy numbers I found out different values went into my Excel sheet. Actually this was because it still held the previous value copied, as the annual reports were “secured”. Why for heaven’s sake should an annual report be protected against the copying of numbers??? Are they hiding something more than NOx emission-values? The only reason I can think of is that they are afraid of automated analysis, like machine learning. At the same time some XBRL-reports will be available, although the only combinations of Volkswagen and XBRL I could find were unrelated, like in this page of the Washington Post or from competitors reporting in XBRL and mentioning Volkswagen too.

VW van (Photo by JarkkoManty on Pixabay)

 

 

 

 

 

The NOx emission scandal is top of mind now, but in the Sixties Volkwagen was the brand somehow representing “freedom”. Both the Beetle and the VW-van were used to travel. Probably those cars were both affordable and reliable anough for longer journeys. Of course the cars are still reliable and e.g. the Golf-model remains very popular.

VW Beetle

(Photo by Pexels on Pixabay – confusing, as the name of the author is also the name of another site with royalty-free pictures. See previous posts.)

 

Typing the numbers instead of copying them wasn’t really a lot of work, so I still ended up with an overview and the right format to be copied into the input-file. This time I was even lazier and reused the PSA template as it converted EUR to USD already. I didn’t forget about the number of companies, so it was a first time right. Not only because of the parameter-line, but also because VW is to the right of the others, where it should be. Previously I sorted the companies from small (left) to large (right) and VW is even larger than Ford or GM. I never realised but now the impact of “dieselgate” makes much more sense! Finally, the legend was adjusted the last time and now the width axis says “Equity” instead of “Eq.”.Five automotive companies in 3D-graph

On double-clicking, the 3D-graph will appear in your web-browser. There are several options to move graph: clicking the right mouse-button, moving the mouse up and down will zoom the graph in and out. Clicking left and moving the mouse at the same time will tilt the graph in different directions (or move the observer’s viewpoint around a fixed graph – it’s relative of course). Double clicking in the graph translates it and moves the centre at the same time. As a result the way the graph tilts will change. Just try it. If you don’t know how to get the normal position back, just refresh the graph.

Apart from VW, the Volkwagen group holds several other brands, listed on Wikipedia. Most of them are well-known (some of them even famous), like Audi, Bentley, Bugatti, Lamborghini, Porsche, Seat, Škoda and also Scania and MAN. Most of them were take-overs and some of the original models looked quite differently before they merged with the VW-design, like Škoda or – less influenced – Seat.

Old Škoda(Photo Škoda by ElvisCZ on Pixabay)

Old Seat

The latter was previously known as “the Spanish Fiat” as one can tell by the looks.

 

 

(Photo Seat by makamuki0 on Pixabay)

 

 

 

 

Some other brands kept their own appearances, like the very Italian Bugatti, Lamborghini Modern Bugatti

(Photo by PIRO4D on Pixabay)

 

 

Modern Bentley

and the very British Bentley.

(Photo by Cbowers on Pixabay)

 

 

 

Both Audi and Porsche were German brands originally, like VW itself and Ferdinand Porsche worked as a designer for VW (beetle!) of course, so the relationship was very tight from the start.

Old Porsche(Photo Porsche by Bru-nO on Pixabay)

Modern Audi

 

 

 

(Photo Audi by PIRO4D on Pixabay)

Then MAN SE, known for its lorries but being a manufacturer of machines as well, is much older than VW itself. Scania, the Swedish manufacturer of trucks is also a more recent aquisition, but has more of a shared history with VW as they became agents for the Beetle and other cars shortly after WW II.

Well, this time less graphs and more cars as we all needed a break, I guess.  For more information, please have a look at our other posts, our website (https://anrep3d.com ) or our youtube-channel. Again, the free demo-package (zip) can be downloaded, unpacked in a folder and the .jar file can be started immediately. Our email-address is info@anrep3d.com

 (Photo by Barni1 on Pixabay)

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Automotive 5 – PSA (Peugeot-Citroën)

Already the fourth company will be added to the graph! This time I wasn’t afraid to take a European company, although it meant I had to recalculate EUR to USD. Of course I had to extact the numbers from six Annual Reports first, but actually it was a pleasure to do so as these documents are well structured. Although the total set was way over a thouasand pages in total, a very good financial abstract was presented at the first pages after the introduction every time. The consolidated totals were taken, like the profit shown in the picture below.

Annual Report PSA

 

After this picture– probably boring for some people – it’s time for a legendary car from the PSA history.  (Photo by skylark on Pixabay) 2CV

 

Recalculating EUR to USD is always tricky. For the balance end of year rates will apply and for the revenue and profit the best option is the mid-year rate. I was a little bit lazy as I knew it was already done for another post some of the years. Then the missing years were derived from the same website with historical exchange-rates. Remember, I’m only showing the potential of our 3D-graph generator here, so don’t use my calculations for serious business purposes as you may have do it in a different way. Yet, the 3D-graph presented below will offer valuable insights.

(Photo by WikimediaImages on Pixabay) Peugeot Blue

One detail I have to share. On generating the new 3D-graph, with PSA in it, I forgot to adjust the number of companies – again! After correction, I noticed the order was not a nice one, as the large “buildings” made the others invisible from several angles. PSA is somewhere in between GM and Ford (more or less equal size) and Mitsubishi, so I changed the order to: Mitsubishi, PSA, Ford, GM. This way it’s easier to get a good overview. No need to show you all the steps this time. It will do to explain the procedure was similar to the one in previous blogs. For more details about the spreadsheet and its calculations, just mail me. Below a screenshot of the graph is shown.

(clickable – see below for instructions about how to manipulate the real 3D-graph that will appear) Automotive4 3D graph

All this was done in seconds by the way. Getting a nice picture of a relevant car takes more time than generating a new AnRep3D-graph! In this post I will present a couple of screenshots. Although you will be able to see the 3D-graph yourself, some explanation could be helpful.

Citroën Van (Photo by educnormandie on Pixabay)

The graph holds a legend (or key) also in 3D, showing the variables presented in different directions.Legend of 3D graph

 

The height of a building is the revenue and the green roof represents the profit. The thickness of the roof varies with the amount of profit and its relation to the total height gives an impression of the margin, e.g. 1%, 5% or 10% of the height of the building being roof. Of course profit could be negative (a loss) and in those cases the roof will be red. As the costs are higher than the revenue in these cases, the yellow part will show the revenue and the total height will represent the costs made to obtain this revenue. By the way: I was in a hurry when I entered Equity as just “Eq.”. This will be changed in an upcoming post.

Peugeot 402 1936

(Photo by MarkThomas on Pixabay)

If we wouldn’t take the net profit but e.g. the EBITDA, a larger part of the building would be coloured. The legend or key will show what is in the graph. Don’t forget tot put the right labels in and to take the same variables for all companies!

The width of a building represents its Equity in this case and the depth shows the total Assets. This means the ratio of the floor shows indicates the gearing (using the total Liabilities instead of the total Assets would even be better to judge the gearing of course). The height (thickness) of the roof versus the width represents the Return on Equity. Total height compared to the depth shows the ratio of the revenue to the total Assets and so on. Of course any variable can be used for a direction, as long as it makes sense. In previous posts we presented the energy-mix for different countries in time, showing e.g. fossil fuels, nuclear energy and renewables in the three dimensions.

Citroën Cactus (Photo by dimitrisvetsikas1969 on Pixabay)

Knowing what the graph shows, it’s time for some additional screenshots. If you double-click the picture, the real 3D-graph will appear in your web-browser (if Javascript and WebGL are enabled and assuming you are online).

Automotive4 3D graphOn double-clicking, the 3D-graph will appear in your web-browser. There are several options to move graph: clicking the right mouse-button, moving the mouse up and down will zoom the graph in and out. Clicking left and moving the mouse at the same time will tilt the graph in different directions (or move the observer’s viewpoint around a fixed graph – it’s relative of course). Double clicking in the graph translates it and moves the centre at the same time. As a result the way the graph tilts will change. Just try it. If you don’t know how to get the normal position back, just refresh the graph.

 

 

 

 

In the screenshot to the top, we see the 3D-graph from above. The years with profit and loss for the different companies are clearly visible! The screenshot to the bottom was turned around 180 degrees. Here we see GM started out with a loss in 2012, while Ford was making good profit. This is quite different from the situation in 2017, when both were doing well.

Peugeot (Photo by AutoPhotography on Pixabay)

For more information, please have a look at our other posts, our website (https://anrep3d.com ) or our youtube-channel . Again, the free demo-package (zip) can be downloaded, unpacked in a folder and the .jar file can be started immediately.

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Automotive 4 – GM (General Motors)

Time for the third automotive company to enter the graph! By now you will know the procedure, so this post will be rather short. After Ford it makes sense to take the annual reports from General Motors.  It’s also a lazy choice, as GM publishes in USD and the reporting year is equal to the calendar-year.

(Photo by MichaelGaida on PixabayCadillac)

Cadillac

General Motors holds a variety of brands and to be honest, I knew only half of them. Of course the famous ones like Buick, Chevrolet (including the rebranded Daewoo), Cadillac and GMC are obvious, but I never saw a Holden, BaoJun, WuLing and JieFang. Perhaps this is because the latter three are Chinese joint ventures – with JieFang focusing on trucks – and Holden being Australian.

Chevrolet CamaroChevrolet Camaro

(Photo by Juhasz Imre on Pexels)

The annual reports of GM were really nice and structures. It took little time to collect all the numbers and no surprises came up. In the previous posts we took Revenue, (net) Profit, Equity and (total) Assets to be put in the input-file, so it had to be the same set for GM. This time I thought it would be nice to offer you the Excel, including the tab from which I derived the .csv-file, becoming a part of the input-file.

BuickBuick (Photo by Smarko on Pixabay)

Be aware that this is not an input-file yet, because a parameter-line has to be present. That’s why I also add the complete input-file both as a picture and a download this time.

Input-fileIf you want to use it with the free demo, that’s fine but it will only read one line and create a graph with one single “building”. By rotating the lines in the input-file, this could be a different “building” every time, so in the end it is possible to see them all. Of course this will bring you 3×6 (companies times years) = 18 different graphs instead of the single one created by the licenced generator.

 

GMC carGMC

(Photo by SHRAVANKUMAR on Pixabay)

 

 

Although I put pictures of cars in my posts, the AnRep3D-generator is not as poetic. It is about financial information being visualised. Yet I want to present another picture of the famous Cadillac, before the 3D-graph is shown.

Another CadillacAnother Cadillac (Photo by MichaelGaida on Pixabay)

Now it’s time for the 3D-graph! I had to adjust the scaling-factor in the input-file as it was still aligned with Mitsubishi, which turned out to be rather small in comparison with Ford and GM. Now it fits the screen. Below a screenshot is shown.

3D-graph 3 automotive companiesClicking the screenshot will open the 3D-graph in another tab in your browser (WebGL and JavaScript have to be active). The real 3D-graph is an html5-file and the image can be translated and rotated in any direction.

 

 

 

There are several options to move graph: clicking the right mouse-button, moving the mouse up and down will zoom the graph in and out. Clicking left and moving the mouse at the same time will tilt the graph in different directions (or move the observer’s viewpoint around a fixed graph – it’s relative of course). Double clicking in the graph translates it and moves the centre at the same time. As a result the way the graph tilts will change. Just try it. If you don’t know how to get the normal position back, just refresh the graph.

HoldenHolden (Photo by SunriseGraphics on Pixabay)

 

 

 

 

For more information, please have a look at our other posts, our website (https://anrep3d.com) or our youtube-channel. Again, the free demo-package (zip) can be downloaded, unpacked in a folder and the .jar file can be started immediately.

Cadillac Lounge Cadillac Lounge (Photo by Free-Photos on Pixabay)

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Automotive 3 – Ford

The 3D-graph was created last time, so now we only have to add companies to it. That’s easy, as the input-file consists of blocks. A block holds a set of lines (one for every year) for a company. Let’s add Ford, because it is in USD already and its book-year is equal to the calendar-year. An easy post this time, without complications – or so I thought.

The first step is to get Ford’s annual reports of course. Because we already took the classic set Revenue, net Profit, Equity and total Assets (RPEA) for Mitsubishi, we have to do the same for Ford as we shouldn’t compare apples and oranges.

Ford Mercury(Photo by Luis Quintero on Pexels)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

By now you know I look for the word “consolidated” to move to the financial statements as quick as possible. Doing so I noticed Ford is not only a motor company, but is also offering financial services. Not very strange and only a small part of the numbers, so I just took the totals. On copying the values from the balance-sheet, I took the liabilities as well. We don’t need them for this graph and those numbers won’t be in the input-file but it allows me to check whether the sum of equity and liabilities meets the total assets. If not, there will be a typo or I picked the wrong column. (I use copy-paste and sometimes the actual year reported is in the left column another time it’s in the right one, so a mistake is made easily.  Another time I just miss a part of the number when selecting).

Unfortunately, the sum of Liabilities and Equity did not match the Assets, although the numbers were right! Then I discovered this floating number representing a “redeemable non-controlling interest”. Well, that’s fine but I don’t like it this way. Reading the note, I understood it was a temporary situation to be solved the next year. The amount was part of the total assets, but kept out of the equity.

Old futuristic Ford (Photo by ID12019 on Pixabay)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Then the next year the same thing happened and the year after as well. All six annual reports showed this gap of some dozens of millions, floating between liabilities and assets. Of course it’s not a “side letter” and a note was available, so it’s transparent and let’s move on. Two solutions were available to close the gaps again: 1) add the floating value to the equity or 2) remove it from the assets – actually setting the assets equal to the sum of equity and liabilities. I preferred the latter as the impact is smaller. Please keep this in mind when looking at the graph!

Classic Ford (Photo by scottwebb on Pexels)

 

 

 

 

Creating the additional block for the input-file wasn’t very hard. I saved the previous one (Mitsubishi) under a new, neutral name and added the block from ford.csv (the excel-sheet saved as an MS-DOS csv). Then I generated the file and … was surprised to see Mitsubishi and nothing else. After a couple of seconds I realised that the “number of companies” in the parameter-line was still 1 (one). After changing it to 2 (as the file holds two companies now), the 3D-graph was generated again.

Ford Thunderbird (Photo by Gustavo Belemmi on Pixabay)

 

 

 

 

Below the steps of the process are shown. The first screen is a kind of concise manual:

AnRep3D generator 1

Then the input- and output-files have to be selected – first the input-file:

AnRep3D generator 2

After clicking the button “inputfile” all files in the folder are shown. Among all the files visible are a couple of annual reports, the excel-sheets for Mitsubishi and Ford, the generator itself (a .jar – just like the free demo-package to be downloaded from our website) and the input-file, renamed to automotive.txt  The output-file automotive.htm – the actual 3D-graph – is already present because of the first attempt.

AnRep3D generator 3

The same screen appears when looking for the output-file. If there is none yet, the name of a new file can be entered. The extension will be .htm anyway. This time the output-file was already present and the generator asked me if I wanted to overwrite. I clicked “Yes”. The result is the screen below:

 

AnRep3D generator 4

 

After clicking “Start” the confirmation-screen appears. The 3D-graph is available in the folder now and can be started in the web-browser (webGL and Javascript should be allowed in the settings).

AnRep3D generator 5

 

 

 

Again we present a screenshot only, but a clickable one. On clicking the picture below original 3D-graph will be shown in your web-browser. Suddenly Mitsubishi Motors looks small, because Ford is so much larger. The values are 5 – 15 times higher (e.g. revenue for Ford is about 150 billion USD, but for Mitsubishi Motors it is about 20 billion USD). When the other companies get in, we will resize the 3D-graph again.Mitsubishi-Ford

(There are several options to move graph: clicking the right mouse-button, moving the mouse up and down will zoom the graph in and out. Clicking left and moving the mouse at the same time will tilt the graph in different directions (or move the observer’s viewpoint around a fixed graph – it’s relative of course). Double clicking in the graph translates it and moves the centre at the same time. As a result the way the graph tilts will change. Just try it. If you don’t know how to get the normal position back, just refresh the graph.)

For more information, please have a look at our other posts, our website (https://anrep3d.com) or our youtube-channel. Again, our free demo-package (zip) can be downloaded, unpacked in a folder and the .jar file can be started immediately. The screens look the same as the pictures above (with some warnings it’s a demo). Only one company and one year will be visualised as only one data-line will be read, otherwise it’s equal to the paid version. For any questions, contact us at info@anrep3d.com

Ford Oldtimer(Photo by hansbenn on Pixabay)

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Automotive – 2: Mitsubishi

In the previous post we explained the steps to be taken to get a full graph with six automotive companies over six years. Every next post a company will be added to the 3D-graph, but as we did’t create a 3D-graph yet, this will be done now. For no specific reason I picked Mitsubishi Motors (remember: not the whole Mitsubishi Chaebol) as the first in line. The annual reports are avialable at this link:  Mitsubishi  https://www.mitsubishi-motors.com/en/investors/library/anual.html?intcid2=investors-library-anual

The bookyear is “broken” and ends at March 31. This means the greater part of the bookyear is in the previous calendar-year and therefore we will consider the annual reports to be about the calendar-year before. So 2018 will be treated as 2017 and so on until 2013 representing 2012 – to align the numbers as much as possible with the book-years of other companies.

The fastest way to get to the balance and overview of profit and loss is to search for the word “consolidated”. In most annual reports it points to the financial sector in a few clicks. Below an example is shown for (parts of) the Profit & Loss statement and the Balance sheet. The Revenue-number is called “Net Sales”.

Profit_Loss_Mitsubishi

Another example shows a collage from the Balance-sheet for the same book-year.

Balance_Sheet Mitsubishi

Here the difference between Assets and Liabilities (Equity) is referred to as “Total Net Assets”. Of course the values for Net profit and Total Assets were also extracted from those tables, but are not visible in the examples above. Although the amounts are in JPY (Yen), it turns out that only the reports named 2018 and 2017 were purely in yen, but the older ones have dollar-columns for the reported year. This saves a lot of time. To obtain the right JPY-to-USD rates, I went to:

https://www.poundsterlinglive.com/best-exchange-rates/us-dollar-to-japanese-yen-exchange-rate-on-2017-09-30

The link is an example of September 30, 2017. This is the middle of the bookyear ending at March 31 2018 and is the best estimate for Revenue and Profit. The “Average: 1 USD = 112.5505 JPY” at this date was used, but for the balance I took the end of the bookyear. Then the average was 106,0115. The same principle was applied to the values for the bookyear ending at ending at March 31 2017.

Mitsubish Barbie

Picture from Petr Elvis at Pixabay https://pixabay.com/en/users/ElvisCZ-1106877/

 

 

 

All relevant values (and then some) were entered in an Excel spreadsheet and checks were performed to be sure the right values were in. (E.g. Equity + Total Liabilities should be equal to Total Assets. Sometimes there was a rounding error of 1 and as it was about millions of yen the rounding error was 1 million yen or about ten-thousand USD, but that’s ok I guess). The conversions to USD were also done in the Excel and provided millions of USD – a much smaller amount of course – but the dollar-values in the older reports were in thousands of USD. Finally, after a little reshuffling and re-modeling, I got this input-file (the first line is the parameter-line)  when I saved the Excel-sheet as an MS-DOS .csv:

Mitsubishi Inputfile AnRep3D

The additional semicolons don’t harm and neither do empty lines after the last entry.

 

 

The generator was able to convert the input-data into an html5-page (.htm-format) and I was curious how it would look. However, al I saw was a blank page. At first I didn’t understand, but then I noticed my Internet-connection was broken. When the graph is loaded into the web-browser, a service from the Fraunhofer IGD is called. This service, called X3DOM (pronounced as X-freedom) converts the X3D the generator created into – very complex – JavaScript. After the conversion it is possible to download the result by right-clicking and then no internet-connection is needed to view the graph, but the first time the connection to this service has to be in place. Connecting to the Internet again, I saw a really huge yellow block and I realised I forgot to set the scaling-factor. The numbers were up to several hundreds of thousands, so I changed the scaling-factor from 1 to 500 (the new value is in the picture above – it’s the third value of the parameter-line). Then a normal 3D-graph came up and this is the one I will share with you below. Next time a second company will be added, and then a third and so on. The picture below is clickable and clicking will show the 3D-graph in the browser. By the way: the green roofs represent profit and the red one is about a loss.

AnRep3D graph Mitsubishi

(There are several options to move graph: clicking the right mouse-button, moving the mouse up and down will zoom the graph in and out. Clicking left and moving the mouse at the same time will tilt the graph in different directions (or move the observer’s viewpoint around a fixed graph – it’s relative of course). Double clicking in the graph translates it and moves the centre at the same time. As a result the way the graph tilts will change. Just try it. If you don’t know how to get the normal position back, just refresh the graph.)

This time I don’t comment on the graph (yet). Have a look and draw your own conclusions.

Don’t forget to visit our website: https://anrep3d.com/ It’s also possible to contact us directly mailto:info@anrep3d,com  The movies at our YouTube channel provide more in depth explanations about the 3D-graph generator.

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