Using the free demo-generator – relative instead of absolute comparison.

Last time I promised the new series of blog-posts would be about graphs generated with the new, free demo-generator. Of course we like it if people purchase a full license, but who would do so without knowing whether the product offers added value? That’s why we offer the demo-generator for free. Even no registration, no cookies – it’s completely anonymous! Yet we think some people won’t stay anonymous, because the will share their experiences. It’s up to you of course, so get a free copy of the package, including a manual and examples of input- and output-files (the graphs in html-format). Just go to: https://anrep3d.com/free-demo to have a look.

Is the demo-generator free because it’s useless? Certainly not! The only limitation is the number of lines to be read and therefore the number of “buildings”. Only the first data-line will be processed and therefore only one building will appear in the graph.
That’s the only difference!

Below an example is shown of a graph generated with the free demo-generator (I didn’t pay for it but downloaded it for free from our own website): it’s about Royal Philips, a well-known Dutch manufacturer focusing on medical equipment now but still owning a part of their old lighting division. The picture below is a collage of screenshots. Philips 2016

 

 

Double click it to see the real dynamic 3D graph. Clicking left and moving the mouse will tilt the graph in different directions (or move the observer’s viewpoint around a fixed graph – it’s relative of course). Double clicking in the graph translates it and moves the centre at the same time. As a result the way the graph tilts will change. Just try it. If you don’t know how to get the normal position back, just refresh the graph.

Having only on “building” means an absolute comparison between companies or for different years is not possible. Yet comparing companies will be possible in a relative way.

What does this mean? Well, the AnRep3D graphs show four basic characteristics of a company in a certain year: revenue, profit, equity and total assets. The exact names will differ between annual reports and sometimes the income from operations is much lower than the actual sales, but that’s up to you.

The main point is some companies have a very high equity to total assets ratio whilst others hardly have any equity (e.g. banks and insurance companies, mainly working with borrowed capital). Then some companies will make profit and others will report a loss (usually start-ups and very innovative companies like Tesla). The revenue can be very, very high when compared to the equity or total assets, but for others it’s very low (capital-intensive industries, with significant investments in e.g. production lines).

These industries will have very different shapes when presented in an AnRep3D graph. Your graphs could be compared with such basic examples and although the size won’t tell a lot (the graph for a huge company could look more or less the same as a very small one), the shapes will.

To facilitate such a relative comparison, I present four different examples of types of industries, to be recognised by their graphs. Five Dutch companies were selected. It’s about their characteristics so it doesn’t matter if you know them, as long as it’s clear what kind of business they are in.

The four are:

  • Royal Dutch Shell (Gas, Oil, Electricity and Renewables),
  • ING (a bank both retail and wholesale),
  • Randstad (mainly a temp and recruitment agency) and
  • Takeaway (a former start-up delivering meals from third parties).

For now, we will present some screenshot-collages. Clicking on the image will start the real 3D graph in your default browser (both Javascript and WebGL should be enabled). If you don’t trust the connection, download the .htm file first, using right-click. Have a look at the file and start it locally by double clicking it in Windows Explorer.

The real graphs can be manipulated in real-time: clicking left and moving the mouse will tilt the graph in different directions (or move the observer’s viewpoint around a fixed graph – it’s relative of course). Double clicking in the graph translates it and moves the centre at the same time. As a result the way the graph tilts will change. Just try it. If you don’t know how to get the normal position back, just refresh the graph.

ING 2016

Shell 2016

 

 

 

 

Randstad 2016

Takeaway 2016

 

 

 

Next week we will discuss the characteristics of the four companies, being a representative of very different types of industries. In between you can download your free demo-package and try it yourself: https://anrep3d.com/free-demo

Or have a look at our website: AnRep3D

 

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About AnRep3D

AnRep3D is the new company, founded after the handover of Scientassist (together with VRBI) to one of my sons. From now I will focus on three-dimensional graphs for the financial markets, showing the main figures from annual reports in comparison.
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